Tag Archives: Tourism

Back to the Mani, and the magic is still there

  • The church of Odigitraea – ‘Our Lady who shows the way’ – in the shadows of a Deep Mani cliff. Photograph by Paul Nettleton

  • The church of Odigitraea or Agritria comes more clearly into view. Photograph by Paul Nettleton

  • The entrance to a cave can be seen behind the church. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Fresco of the Archangel Michael. The pen and scrap of paper are for recording donations. Photograph by Paul Nettleton

  • A view past the church north towards Tigani and Areopolis. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

There’s a moment on the road from Kalamata to Areopolis when you drive round yet another hairpin bend after a seemingly endless climb upwards and then catch your breath at the view ahead.

Laid out before you to the left are the Taygetos mountains, stretching south as far as the eye can see. And below, on the coastal plain where a mountain gorge reaches the sea, is the village of Kardamyli where the war hero and travel writer Patrick Leigh Fermor made his home.

Beyond, the resort of Stoupa and fishing village of Agios Nikolaos nestle in their respective bays. Other villages cling to the mountain sides or among the olive groves of the foothills.

This is the Mani peninsula in the Greek Peloponnese and I wrote here earlier this year how the place was drawing me back after an absence of two summers. So is this still a magic place? My answer is an unequivocal yes.

The economic and political crisis in the country meant change was inevitable. But there has also been a gradual passing on of family businesses to the next generation. In Stoupa that means the ice cream at the Koumoundouros family-run Gelateria is now made by daughter Katerina in succession to her father Dimitrios. She is also selling locally made preserves and other craft foodstuffs, with an evident pride in the regional produce.

That pride is also in evidence at Elaia, a seafront café bar featuring local specialities which has replaced a jewellery shop after the succession from mother to daughter.

‘The austerity’

In what local people call ‘the austerity’ the main complaint seems, justifiably, to be about spending cuts to refuse collection. Overflowing bins were being cleared, eventually, but fly-tipping of old window frames, builder’s rubble, mattresses and more seems to be a bad habit which the situation has exacerbated. There again, it’s the same at home in Epping Forest.

One discovery of this visit was finally to find the way to a Byzantine church that captures something of the Maniot zeal for mastering the tough natural environment.

For that, thanks to this year’s edition of Inside the Mani magazine. Printed in a smaller format to cut costs and advertising rates, this edition gives directions to the Deep Mani church of Odigitraea – ‘Our Lady who shows the way’ – which is also known as Agitria, I learn from John Chapman’s invaluable web guide to Mani history.

You have to venture south of Areopolis for this trip. The well worn Taygetos range here looks like a good setting for a moussaka western. The main road continues south to Gerolimenas, worth a stop in its own, where the harbour is set against a steep cliff.

But we must turn west at the sign for Stavri and the Tsitsiris Castle hotel on a minor road that can take you on a circuit below the Cavo Grosso escarpment and a possible clifftop site for ancient Hippola. Follow the road through Stavri village and past the hotel towards the Tigani causeway. Ahead you can see and (if the day is not too hot) walk out to a frying pan shaped promontory that was fortified by Guillame de Villehardouin, prince of Achaea, and may be the site of the Castle of Maina, a possible source for the name Mani.

You can take a car much of the way towards the church on a dirt track, though we walked from a road junction closer to Stavri. Instead of heading to Tigani and the castle remnants, turn left at a broken signpost {chances are it will remain broken for now] to reach the coastal path that leads to the church.

The setting is spectacular, though the small church may be hard to spot against the similarly coloured cliff behind. It perches above a sheer drop to the sea, with the Cavo Grosso looming beyond.

The church was built in front of caves said once to have been lived in by hermit monks. I clambered up and found the ceilings of the caves blackened by age-old soot.

The church itself is unlocked and inside there are faded frescoes and the trappings of occasional worship. It’s beautiful, though clearly has been battered by the elements over the years.

The peace of this place and the warmth of the welcome in the Mani was so at odds with what has followed since with the murder in Athens of the anti-fascist hip-hop artist Pavlos Fyssas. Greece is being battered by events, but is still beautiful. If mainstream society is now waking up to the threat of Golden Dawn, then there is hope that it will remain so.

Footnotes

Peter Eastland is a photographer living in the Mani who has captured the land and its people in a way I cannot. His website is at www.manieye.com.

While swimming at Delfini Bay, a favourite beach outside Stoupa, there were more jellyfish than usual. They were Cotylorhiza tuberculata,whose sting, I read , is harmless to humans. Here’s a link to some video of this medusa:

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/65892295 ]

 

 

Croatia puts on a Battersea fair

 

Gaz in the Brijuni archipelago off the south-west coat of Istria in Croatia. Photograph: Renco Korinozic/Croatian Tourist Board

Gaz in the Brijuni archipelago off the south-west coat of Istria in Croatia. Photograph: Renco Korinozic/Croatian Tourist Board

 

In a hall at Battersea Arts Centre, just round the corner from Clapham Junction, the European Union’s latest recruit was showing off its wares.

While Europe continues to divide the Conservative party and define Ukip by what it opposes, here were businesses keen to make deals in the single market.

Croatia was once part of the Austro-Hungarian empire and later part of Marshall Tito’s communist federation of Yugoslavia. It declared independence in 1991 and cleared occupying Serb armies by 1995. Now a member of Nato, Croatia signed the EU treaty of accession in 2011 and will become a member on 1 July.

Stalls at a trade fair organised by the British Croation Business Club were festooned with products that will be familiar to tourists who venture further south to Greece or Turkey – many the products of the olive tree. Olive oil, olive oil soap infused with medicinal herbs, olive tapenade.

Neb Chupin of Hermes International was promoting the Taste Dalmatia range of conserves. There were bitesize samples of tapenade, sour cherry or organic fig spread, the latter an explosion of flavour when married with a little cheese.

A British couple, Tim and Paula Batson-Jones, were explaining how they are involved at every stage of producing their 100% extra virgin olive oil. They help harvest the native Oblica olives from their own groves on Brač, near Split, oversee its pressing and bottling, then drive back to Bristol and sell mail order through their website, croatianimports.co.uk.

Gold medal

Sounds small scale. Yes, but they recently saw off 200 rivals to win a gold medal for the quality of their oil. That sounds like a recipe for success.

Tim sounds a little concerned for Croatia’s future in the EU. It’s perfect as it is, he reckons. Small, you feel, is beautiful for many of the stallholders. It’s explained to me that while much business is carried out in euros, the country will be retaining its own currency, the kuna. It means marten in Croatian and is based on the medieval use of pelts as units of trading value. There are 100 lipa (linden or lime trees) to the kuna.

Another British enthusiast for the country, Sarah Driver of Walk Croatia, can hardly wait to accompany the first group of the summer to go wine tasting along the Pelješac peninsula, north of Dubrovnik. It’s not just the wine or the walking, but the oysters of Mali Ston Bay, the only successful breeding ground of the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis. The company offers island-hopping walking and sailing holidays in the Dubrovnik region.

 Empty beaches

You don’t have to go far to find historical sites, islands with empty beaches or rugged mountain scenery in a country where the climate is a mix of the Mediterranean and continental.

There were bigger companies represented, among them Croatia Airlines, patrt of the Star Alliance, and Valamar Hotels & Resorts with 39 properties along the Adriatic coast. They represent the modern face of Croatian corporate business, with glossy bilingual inflight magazines and brochures.

There was tradition too, in the cheeses of Paska Sirana, a company from the island of Pag. Layers of sea salt swept in by the winter winds cover the grasses and herbs of this rocky island. Paški Sir, the hard cheese made from the milk of sheep that graze this land, has protected geographical origin and a unique taste. Eat as an appetiser if young, and a dessert if old.

But I was most taken by the enthusiasm of Hrvoje Subat, a young committee member of the British Croatian Business Club who lives in London and energetically promotes his home country as a place to invest in property; of wine importer Mislav Kapetanovic, shepherding tastings of fresh, green appley Grasevina whites, a modern take on native grapes from the Danube valley bottled by vintner Vina Belje, alongside more traditional reds including Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.

It made for a heartening contrast to the blinkered British cynicism about Europe and all its works. And it made me add Croatia to my must-see list of countries.

Stoupa casts a lasting spell for this visitor to Greece

  • Stoupa

    Stoupa with the Taygetos mountains behind. The new church is next to its predecessor. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Agios

    The small fishing harbour at Agios Nikolaos. Picturesque in summer, it provides little shelter in bad weather. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Kardamyli

    Roadside reading in Kardamyli. But the peace can be broken when coaches and trucks carrying quarried stone try to pass through the main street. Photogrpah: Paul Nettleton

  • Taygetos

    The mountain road across the Taygetos looking back to the highest peak, Profitis Ilias. The surface is not always so smooth. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Limeni

    Limeni boasts a locally famous fish taverna. It was the home of the Mavromichalis clan, who helped Greece win independence. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Areopoli

    Behind the blue door in Areopoli, capital of the Mani, is a hotel in a restored tower house. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

  • Stoupa sunset

    Sunset over the Bay of Kalamata at Stoupa. Photograph: Paul Nettleton

For a gallery of images please click on the photograph above

 

The pull of the place has proved too much. Rival places in the summer sun have been considered and cast aside. Two years is too long to have stayed away from this Greek gem. Stoupa it is, then, for the holidays.

Kardamyli, a few kilometres to the north on the west coast of the Mani peninsula in the Peloponnese, may have more cachet. Stephen Fry was tweeting from there last month, at the house of the late Patrick Leigh Fermor. It is to be converted to a writer’s retreat after being left to the Benaki Museum. Though budget cuts have reportedly delayed this prospect, Before Midnight, the recent film by Richard Linklater, with Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, was shot there.

The ashes of an earlier literary pilgrim to the house, Bruce Chatwin, were scattered near a tiny church in the foothills of the Taygetos mountain ridge that rises behind the town, at a spot that will be blanketed in wild flowers about now. Mountain roads lead up into the Vassiliki forest and across the spine of the peninsula. A trek by 4×4 is worth the early start to make a late lunch in the port of Gythio, though when I made the journey I passed a British couple making the trip by mountain bike.

Perhaps trendier is Itilo Bay, to the south below Areopoli, the capital of the Mani. Its boutique hotels pop up regularly in the travel pages of the “better” newspapers and magazines. Here the mountain backdrop is more lunar, a stony hint of the stark rocky landscape further to the south. Last time we passed through there was fresh growth poking through the ashes of brush fires that had threatened to jump the coast road and reach a popular fish taverna at Limeni.

The Rough Guide has always been dismissive of Stoupa, deemed too touristy by half since the village was discovered by package holiday companies. And today there are many more lights at night in the hinterland among the olive groves after a house-building boom – perhaps not a property bubble, but the collapse of the Greek economy means there are bargains to be had on the site of house-hunters such as Susan Shimmin.

‘ On the house’

Still, it remains a place where it is possible to instantly relax, where the setting sun plays across a bay fringed by a sandy town beach, tiny harbour and a variety of tavernas competing, but not too intrusively, for your trade. Here, previous visitors are welcomed back with a glance of recognition, a few warm words and sometimes a little something “on the house”. Get to know the owner and there is catching up to be done since last time you talked.

Or stroll around the headland to Kalogria Bay, even quieter at night despite bustling during the day with beach volleyball and bat and ball games and Greek family groups occupying rows of sun loungers arranged under ranks of matching parasols.

At both beaches the sand slopes gently enough into the sea for young children to splash about during the day and into the evening, when the sometimes fierce sun mellows. Just occasionally there’ll be a few breakers to bring some added excitement. Swim out or take a snorkel tube to explore the rocks, and there are the swirls of the icy cold springs that one day the engineers hope to tap for fresh water.

Look back to the land as you swim and the ring of mountains beyond the village, where the tallest building is a new church built alongside its predecessor, adds a dramatic backdrop to the scene.

 Wild tortoises

If those clouds billowing up stay over the mountains, local weather lore has it, the rain will stay away. Over the sea the clouds can herald a short, sharp thunderstorm that cools the air, washes away the dust and brings out the wild tortoises for a stroll.

A mile or two south is Agios Nikolaos, a picture postcard Greek fishing village where the catch is sold from a slab each day. The harbour wall here offers little protection from winter storms and most of the boats are removed when the summer is over.

There’s history to be explored in and around the Mani – Byzantine churches of all sizes, caves at Diros where the boatmen on the underground river have a firm way with tourists. Investigation of the Neolithic settlements here continues. The ruins of Mystras and Ancient Messine are within driving distance. And the landscape of the inner or deep Mani towards Cape Matapan or Tainaron, the southernmost point of mainland Greece, can take your breath away.

Here there are tower houses in largely deserted villages such as Vathia where rival clans fought their battles in quite recent history. These are being aped by builders further north who use the abundant local stone to construct holiday homes with fake crumbling battlements, which does Greek architecture a disservice.

The fortunes of Stoupa have doubtless taken a knock as Greece hit the rocks but over the years changes have often been dictated by corporate whim in London. The stickers of holiday brands long since swallowed by Thomson or Thomas Cook can still be seen outside travel agencies, shops or tavernas.

Fashion in the tourist trade has moved towards no-frills airlines and self-booked hotels. Since the collapse of the British charter airline XL, independent tour operators have resorted to obscure airlines that have not lasted more than a season or two.

EasyJet launched a service to Kalamata from London Gatwick this year, promptly to have Thomas Cook buy up many of the seats for the summer. Olympic Holidays, with whom w’re travelling, are using the little known Germania as well as EasyJet. Ryanair last year flew to Araxos, near Patras, but has cancelled the route. A recently completed motorway from Athens now reaches Kalamata for those willing to drive or take the coach from the capital.

The hardworking local families are changing with the times as is Stoupa. Where once there were a few phone kiosks, mobile phones are ubiquitous and broadband service with attendant wi-fi has arrived. Websites are springing up to advertise individual apartments and hotels. But the number of ATMs has taken a tumble along with the economy.

Inside the Mani, a guidebook to the Mani by Matthew Dean and Bob Barrow, British writers and long-term residents, sprang out of an annual magazine and website for visitors that showcases the work of artists inspired by the region, explores its history and promotes local businesses.

Stephan Bartholomä, who runs Zorbas.de travel agency, hosts four webcams and a bulletin board on his website, which can be a fount of information to newcomers.

When specialist UK travel firm Greek Options ceased trading after 17 years, their agents in Stoupa set up a new company, Greek Options – Stoupa, knowing that much of their trade came from repeat business. They cannot yet offer flights but are trying to fill the gap in the market serving those who return year after year.

The spell cast by Stoupa is strong, and it’s pulling me back this year. Yammas!

A growing controversy over the Lee Valley’s glasshouses

  • Tied up

    Narrow boats on the Lee Navigation near Cheshunt. All photographs: Paul Nettleton

  • Quality time

    A family of swans in the Lee Valley

  • Milk ripe

    Berries ripening in the Lee Valley sun

  • Nesting time

    Arranging the eggs

  • Power in the park

    The National Grid electricity sub-station in the Lee Valley park

  • Growth industry?

    Glasshouses seen across the Lee

  • A bit Wind in the Willows

    Aerating a pond in the Lee Valley

For a gallery of images please click on the photograph above

My favourite way in to the River Lee Country Park is to drive up the Crooked Mile from Waltham Abbey and turn left into Fishers Green Lane before parking up and taking a walk or a bicycle ride around the Seventy Acres Lake. Striking out south brings you to the Royal Gunpowder Mills museum, north to more gravel pits and Nazeing Marsh.

It all sounds a bit Wind in the Willows and there are plenty of people messing around in boats – whether it be on the Lee Navigation, where there is a steady traffic of pleasure seekers in narrow boats along the canalised waterway, or at Holyfield Lake. Here the members of Fishers Green sailing club must steer clear of the weirs.

The park draws walkers and anglers and birdwatchers and photographers in all weathers, to watch the comings and goings of the wildfowl and the march of the seasons.

After rain, the Horsemill Stream and the Cornmill Stream and the Small River Lea (the alternative spelling), all part of the flood relief system, can run swift and powerfully. Even when the waters appear placid there’s plenty going on under the surface.

 Invasive species

Invasive virile crayfish have been found in the river, where in the 80s the signal crayfish wiped out the native white clawed crayfish. There are also terrapins, bought as pets during the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fad and released into wild after their owners tired of their growing size and appetites.

Then there are the human battles, for the future of salad growers in and around the regional park. And, with local authority budgets cut, there is political pressure on the authority to become self-financing.

Their glasshouses are, say the growers, too small to secure the long-term viability of the valley’s traditional market gardening. They say they are being squeezed between the demands of supermarket buyers for year-round supply and cheaper produce, and the park’s opposition to expansion of the area under glass.

The park is not a planning authority but has to be consulted by Epping Forest district council, where most of the growers are located. It has no remit to support horticulture, rather seeing production as a secondary function (pdf).

The river has a long history of quarrying and industry which has shaped the valley’s post-industrial landscape alongside farming and the glasshouses which have been in operation for more than a century.

Today, to the east of Cheshunt, there’s a mainline railway running within earshot of the river and electricity pylons march along the valley floor and across the former gravel pits to a substation. National Grid wants to upgrade the overhead lines to carry 400kV instead of the current 275kV. Consent is being sought for the work, with a decision expected by 2014.

The park’s boundaries skirt the extensive industrial estate on the west bank through Brimsdown, and the vast Sainsbury’s distribution centre by the M25 at Waltham Abbey. The jobs they provide are essential. There are pockets of deprivation in the town and it is not so far from Tottenham, which is seeking its own economic recovery after the London riots.

The authority wants the legacy of the London 2012 Olympic Games, with the momentum they generated for regeneration of brownfield sites and the watercourses around Stratford, to be a world class park for Londoners and a tourist draw in the green belt of Essex and Hertfordshire.

Hectare upon hectare of glasshouses, especially built taller and perhaps making more use of artificial lighting to extend the growing season and range of crops, are not seen as an attractive landscape feature. Nor are heavy lorries welcomed to narrow local roads.

A report by consultants to Epping Forest council (pdf) in 2012 set out in considerable detail the challenges for the growers and the dilemma for the councillors, who also have to contend with the pressures on the forest itself as another “green lung” for London.

Among the report’s conclusions were proposals to increase the area designated for protected cropping in glasshouses to head off increasing competition. This comes from abroad and also from Thanet Earth, the development of vast glasshouses in Kent where Combined Heat and Power technology means waste heat is used to warm the crops while electricity is produced for the grid.

 Cucumber festival

When the shelves of the city’s supermarkets boast of locally-sourced or “East Anglian” produce, they are likely to mean cucumbers grown by members of the Lea Valley Growers Association alongside tomatoes and peppers.

For the past two years they even held a Great British Cucumber Festival to celebrate the fact that the valley produces 75% of all UK cucumbers – about 1.2 million a week. There’s no event this year but “Cue Fest” is due to return in 2014.

The Epping Forest report painted a picture of an ageing generation of farmers running businesses on a knife edge of viability, needing to invest to thrive and grow, but hemmed in by physical and planning constraints. The need is for largely level sites, suitable for glasshouses which are regarded as temporary structures, and sufficient energy.

On national salad day last month, David Heath, Minister of State at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, was asked in the Commons by Robert Halfon, the Conservative MP for Harlow, if he was aware of the concentration of salad growers in his consituency around the villages of Roydon and Nazeing.

 Halfon asked his Conservative colleague: “Will the government place more weight on food production in the planning system to help the Lee Valley growers and glasshouse industry in my constituency?”

Hansard records the reply: “There clearly needs to be proper accommodation for growing food stuffs in this country through the planning system, but it is equally right the government are clear on this that local planning decisions need to be taken locally. Central government have continually to remind our colleagues in local government, however, that having sustainable food production in this country is a top priority. We have an increasing population to feed, and we must ensure that we can do so in a sustainable way.”

A reminder perhaps to the park authority that the coalition made transforming the economy a priority for all parts of government, or as David Cameron put it in his first major speech as prime minister in May 2010, a big part of our strategy for growth is getting out of the way of business.”

The views into the LeeValley from High Beach in Epping Forest are striking. A study of Google Earth or Maps gives you an idea of the extensive area under glass, but its hardly on the scale of the Netherlands. My own view is that there is room for more glasshouses without throwing stones at the park’s leisure remit.

 

Coniston and Stratford: honest shops forge an unexpected link

Coniston Institute; self-improvement a speciality

Coniston Institute: self-improvement a speciality. Photographs: Paul Nettleton

There can hardly be two places in England as different as Coniston in the Lake District and Stratford in east London.

One is a village nestling beneath the Old Man peak, squeezed between a ring of Cumbrian fells and Coniston Water; the other has been an industrial suburb of the capital, and is now entering a post-industrial future after hosting the London 2012 Olympics on a brownfield site by the River Lea.

Coniston has lost its copper mines, though there’s still a working slate quarry, while Stratford no longer has a railway works though it remains an important hub.

Yet there is a link, with a nod to that industrial heritage, through art, crafts and architecture.

Walk north along Yewdale Road from the bridge across Church Beck and on the left is the Coniston Institute, which was opened in 1878 after energetic fundraising by John Ruskin, who lived across the lake at Brantwood. It was a new home for the lifelong learning promoted from its foundation in 1852 by the Coniston Mechanics Institute and Literary Society.

In extended premises at the rear of the institute is a museum devoted to Ruskin with exhibits also relating to the copper mines and slate, local geology, lace, farming and Donald Campbell. The museum’s website has some great Coniston links to explore.

There’s a public library and function rooms for hire. And since 2012  there has also been the Honest Shop, stocking local produce and craft. It’s this which provides the link to Stratford.

The use value of art

You can’t go far in this part of Cumbria without coming across the activities and influence of Grizedale Arts, which emphasises the use value of art, and promotes the functions of art and artists in practical and effective roles, as a central tenet of wider culture and society”. 

Grizedale Arts has been working with residents on the renovation and development of the institute. Archtitect Liam Gillick has designed a new self-service library and An Endless Supply, a design studio and run by Harry Blackett and Robin Kirkham, was commissioned to design the interior of the shop “a defibrillator-in-disguise for the UK economy”. There’s a touch of these austere times about the interior.

Goods on display at the Honest Shop in Coniston

Goods on display at the Honest Shop in Coniston

As their website explains, the shop is unstaffed and customers pay for what they take in the honesty box (Grizedale Arts confess that: “Typically for a haven of visitor experience tranquility, the money tin was stolen on day two.”) Profits go to the sellers and are ploughed back into the upkeep of Coniston Institute.

The shop was featured on the BBC’s Countryfile programme. John Craven bought an apricot loaf. We plumped for eccles cakes and a carrot cake with orange frosting.

About 280 miles away (more if you take a scenic route across the Pennines) in London, there’s not yet so much choice at the Honesty Stall situated at the gates to Abbey Gardens in Bakers Row, Stratford, a step away from Abbey Road station on the Docklands Light Railway, where a sign helpfully redirects tourists and Beatles fans looking for a certain zebra crossing to the other Abbey Road in St John’s Wood.

It’s only a stone’s throw from Stratford and West Ham on the London Underground and national rail.

There are railway cottages across the road, and the remains of others within the grounds of this open access community garden (visitors welcome from dawn to dusk when the gates are open). Long before the coming of the railway and the nearby India rubber works and other heavy industry, there had been a 12th century Cistercian abbey on the site, complete with kitchen garden and a gatehouse here.

Public realm

The Friends of Abbey Gardens has been working to reverse years of neglect since 2006. It initiated work on the garden, which has been designed by artists Nina Pope and Karen Guthrie of Somewhere, a multi-disciplinary, non-profit creative company.

The site had to be cleared of contaminated soil before planting for food could begin. Arsenic, lead and benzoapyrene were among the chemicals found in a survey.

Now there’s a sign on a brick wall that asks What will the harvest be? The answer is whatever the regular gardeners agree and there are thousands of wonderful photos on Flickr capturing the activity at the gardens. And some of what’s grown is also sold on the mobile Honesty Stall designed for Abbey Gardens by Andreas Lang.

Work in progress at Abbey Gardens, Stratford, east London

Work in progress at Abbey Gardens, Stratford

One afternoon this week, with a touch of spring finally in the air, preparation and planting in the raised beds and greenhouse with guidance from gardening club leader Hamish Liddle came to a halt while a dunnock sang his heart out from an ivy branch shooting above the wall, attracting a second bird – a possible partner or rival was unclear.

Lang is a key link between Coniston and Stratford through the International Village Shop, a network of trading places for locally rooted goods. A founder of Public Works, he trained at Central St Martins school of art and at the Architectural Association, London. As with Grizedale Arts, Public Works “projects address the question how the public realm is shaped by its various users.

 This spring and summer, both projects are well worth a visit. Don’t forget to put your money in the honesty box.

Margate: a faded seaside town in February – gallery

  • Lido shuffle

    Margate Lido awaits redevelopment. I hope they save the sign. Tracey Emin could have done little better

  • Going down

    The lift to Walpole Bay beach was closed but there were concrete steps straight out of East Germany nearby

  • Sign language

    Margate is littered with signs prohibiting this, that and the other. Some make sense given the speed with which the tide changes

  • Art housed

    Turner Contemporary art gallery and the visitor information centre in Margate

  • Retail revival?

    Margate old town shops. Just add people

  • Margate harbour and, left, the Arlington Tower. Tesco want to build a megastore on the site of the shopping centre with flats. The decision rests with Eric Pickles, the communities secretary

A February Thursday provided the opportunity for a first ever visit to Margate. A walk along the beach, a stroll round the old town’s growing number of retro shops, and fish’n’chips al fresco across the road from the harbour when the sun came out. The attempts to revive this Kent seaside town merit closer study, especially as the Mary Portas designed  scheme is proving controversial. There were French school parties gathering on the steps of the Turner Contemporary gallery,  business people bustling away and a handful of anglers and birdwatchers on the prom. We saved the Dreamland and penny arcade side of town for another visit, and walked past the Winter Gardens – coming soon Simple Minds – and the crumbling Lido built into the cliffs above sandy Walpole Bay beach in Cliftonville. The water quality failed some pollution tests in 2012, which is a shame. Click on the photograph for the gallery. More at http://margatearchitecture.blogspot.co.uk/   Photographs: Paul Nettleton